Indigenous group announces victory in Brazil

Indigenous group announces victory in Brazil

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John Ahni Schertow
August 30, 2007
 

The Cimi-Assessoria de Imprensa, announced today that on August 28, the Brazilian government signed two decrees for the Tupinikim/Guarani, granting them title to 18,070 hectares of lands in the municipality of Aracruz, state of Espirito Santo, Brazil.

You may recall, late last month the Tupinikim/Guarani began a campaign to reclaim their lands. They set out exactly as they had announced, but just two weeks later, on August 11, they were once again evicted.

This recent decision, published in the Federal State Gazette and signed by the Minister of Justice Tarso Genro, is being celebrated by all the seven Tupinikim and Guarani villages.

Let’s just hope Aracruz Cellulose leaves it at that.

From Discovered and Conquered – Cimi-Assessoria de Imprensa, imprensa@cimi.org.br, announced today that the Brazilian government signed on August 28 demarcation decrees for the ownership of Tupinikim/Guarani lands

This historical decision was published in the Federal State Gazette by means of two ministeral decrees, no. 1463 and 1464, signed by the Minister of Justice Tarso Genro, declaring 18,070 hectares of lands in the municipality of Aracruz, state of Espirito Santo, Brazil, as indigenous lands, belonging to the Tupinikim and Guarani peoples. Before this decision, only 7,061 ha had been demarcated and another 11,009 ha had not, and continued being invaded by the eucalyptus and celulose producing company Aracruz Celulose. By means of this decision, the brazilian government fulfilled the brazilian constitution that says that it is the responsiblity of the government to demarcate lands, traditionally occupied by indigenous peoples and necessary for their physical and cultural survival.

The victory has been and continues being celebrated by all the seven Tupinikim and Guarani villages. Yesterday, the Chiefs declared that this victory is both a result from their union, their courage and determination to struggle for the lands they were evicted from in the past, guaranteeing the future of their children, but at the same time, this victory was also possible because of a strong network of support, both in Brazil as well as outside Brazil. (source)

for the ownership of Tupinikim/Guarani lands

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