Indigenous Law and Legal Systems in Canada

Indigenous Law and Legal Systems in Canada

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John Ahni Schertow
March 22, 2008
 

Summary of Indigenous Law and Legal Systems, a conference held at the University of Toronto Faculty of Law, January 27 & 28, 2007. Organized by the Indigenous Law Journal co-Editors-in-Chief, Karen Drake and Kathryn Bird.

Some of the topics discussed at the conference included: Indigenous Nations and the Legal Relativity of European Claims to Territorial Sovereignty in North America; Indigenous Law and its Contribution to Global Pluralism; Aboriginal Traditions of Tolerance and Reparation; Comprehending First Nations Jurisprudence; and Ethical Space: Transforming Relations.

A full list of Speakers and the conference program is available here.

Indigenous Legal Systems in Canada
Professor Bradford Morse speaks on “the Implicit and Explicit Recognition of Indigenous Law in Canada”; and Professor Gordon Christie discusses “Culture, Self-Determination and Colonialism: Issues around the Revitalization of Indigenous Legal Traditions.” Watch the Video (new window)

Aboriginal Title and Sovereignty
Professor Kent McNeil talks about “Indigenous Nations and the Legal Relativity of European Claims to Territorial Sovereignty in North America;” and Professor Brian Slattery discusses “The Metamorphosis of Aboriginal Title.” Watch the Video (new window)

Indigenous Law and its Contribution to Global Pluralism
This is the Keynote Address of the conference, delivered by Professor James Anaya. Watch the Video (new window)

Aboriginal Traditions of Tolerance and Reparation
Professor Darlene Johnston, Faculty of Law at University of Toronto, discusses “Aboriginal Traditions of Tolerance and Reparation.” Watch the Video (new window)

Comprehending First Nations Jurisprudence
Professor James (Sakej) Henderson talks about “Comprehending First Nations Jurisprudence.” Watch the Video (new window)

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