The USAID Virus

The USAID Virus

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August 17, 2012
 

As explained by Juan Carlos Zambrana Marchetti, USAID is like a virus, waiting for the opportunity to attack democratic initiatives within host countries. As Marchetti observes,

It seems, therefore, that USAID has morphed into two basic kinds of operative methods. The first and best known, applicable to nations with a still-porous security like Bolivia and Ecuador, is to enter physically into its territories, make use of its philanthropic reputation as an innocent, and create a relationship of dependency with vulnerable sectors in those countries until embedding itself in the blood stream of the nations.  Subsequently, it facilitates the entry of agencies with worse reputations, like NED, CIA, and NSA to cooperate with the ONGs that provide them cover, in order to destabilize the governments that resist the policies of Washington.

In the second method, used for countries that are better protected, as is the case with Cuba, USAID does not need to establish a physical presence in the territory, because from a distance it finances destabilization through other organizations that cooperate with the local opposition groups.

For countries desiring to live independent of dictates from Washington, he says, expelling USAID must be undertaken with extreme urgency.

 

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