, Voices from the Niyamgiri Hills Voices from the Niyamgiri Hills
Mining Story 197

Voices from the Niyamgiri Hills

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, Voices from the Niyamgiri Hills
October 4, 2008
 

In this eight-minute video, you will hear members of the Dongria Kondh, the custodians of the Niyamrigi hills in Orissa, India, speaking out against Vedanta resources and the hardships they have had to endure as a result of the company’s aluminum refinery.

Placed at the foot of the hills, Vedanta manipulated and then drove out at least one community for the refinery. Now the Kondh suffer from a range of problems; from not being able to sleep because of the noise from the refinery, to getting sore throats when they drink the water and itchy skin when they bathe.

The situation may soon get much worse for the Kondh. Vedanta is currently poised to expand the refinery, and proceed with its plan to build a controversial bauxite mine at the top of the hills. This is despite the bold assurances from Vedanta’s CEO that his company would first consult and gain permission from the Kondh before doing so.

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In the face of this ‘development’, the Dongria Kondh will see their way of life, their economy, their belief system, and their history destroyed.

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Please take moment to sign this letter, imploring the Prime Minister of India to safeguard the Dongria Kondh’s rights.

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