True Believers

True Believers

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August 28, 2012
 

Energy, devotion and commitment to a cause — whether evil or sacred — are dependent on motivation. True believers, whether in human dignity or white supremacy, are highly motivated.

Thus, the battle between good and evil is determined by energy, which is in turn dependent on access to resources required to sustain efforts over time. Since funding for evil is essentially unlimited due to theft, funding for good must be strategically wise to hold evil at bay.

Unfortunately, the majority of funding for good is surreptitiously channeled into coffers of organizations that are long on appearance and short on substance. While pandering to the emotions of small donors, they serve the contrary interests of large donors who also benefit from systematic theft.

So while much energy is expended ostensibly on behalf of the good, little of that energy is effective in producing good results. Were good people to comprehend how they are manipulated into supporting no change, we might be able to again make some headway against evil. Until then, we are fighting a losing battle.

In this 1999 article from the Missoula Independent, Leonard Zeskind and the late Bill Wassmuth spoke of the need for human rights activists to coalesce in the fight for the future of human rights in the impending turmoil caused by globalization. Looking back, their comments about the threat posed by bigotry, as the world confronts scarcity, seem almost prophetic. As Wassmuth invoked, it only takes a few to do serious harm, or good; working together we might be able to limit the former.

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