The Nature of Campaigns

The Nature of Campaigns

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March 19, 2013
 

There is nothing wrong per se with campaigns, as they are part of how we manage multiple aspects of a movement over time. If we are intelligent in our analysis, campaigns are holistic and sequential, prioritizing those aspects essential to those that follow. Sometimes an unexpected window of opportunity enables us to advance on one campaign while others are backburnered.

Campaigns, however, are all that professional progressives do, so for them, the movement is not a primary concern. Sometimes their campaigns interfere with the well-being of the movement. They do what they can get funded; we do what needs to be done.

Campaigns are by nature tactical. Without the strategic guidance of a movement’s goals, they are sometimes rudderless beyond the moment’s objective. This is why we often see professional progressives celebrating tactical achievements that actually undermine strategic goals. Goals are not part of their purview.

With the indigenous peoples movement, there are many competing interests with conflicting stories about what objectives have been achieved, what is happening, and what goals we should commit ourselves to accomplishing. Those that limit their interest to campaigns and not movements are more inclined to adopt a romantic understanding of tactics and strategies.

The magic of iphones, colored flags and emotional slogans is less burdensome than long tedious preparations for self-governance and democratic revolution.

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