States v Nations

States v Nations

Support our journalism. Become a Patron!
Avatar
April 5, 2012
 

Last week, when the Portuguese people marched against IMF austerity measures imposed by the EU against their country, they asserted their right to self governance as a sacred duty and social obligation. When Indigenous nations arrive in Rio de Janeiro this summer to discuss sustainable development, they will assert those same duties and obligations usurped by the UN.

As Dr. Mirjam Hirch argued three years ago in her post Nations are Governing Authorities, Not NGOs, original nations have laws, cultures and governing authorities that exercise political and policing powers over 80 % of the world’s remaining biodiversity. When they are denied their role by the UN, she says, the world’s ability to solve complex problems is undermined.

When the UN attempts to relegate Indigenous authorities to the status of mere advocates, it is championing the laws of states over the laws of nations. And the laws of states, as we know, are more oriented toward protecting investment portfolios than toward saving the planet or humankind.

We're fighting for our lives

Indigenous Peoples are putting their bodies on the line and it's our responsibility to make sure you know why. That takes time, expertise and resources - and we're up against a constant tide of misinformation and distorted coverage. By supporting IC you're empowering the kind of journalism we need, at the moment we need it most.

independent uncompromising indigenous
Except where otherwise noted, articles on this website are licensed under a Creative Commons License
IC is a publication of the Center for World Indigenous Studies (cwis.org), a 501C(3) based in the United States