, On “the League of Indigenous Sovereign Nations” On "the League of Indigenous Sovereign Nations"
, On “the League of Indigenous Sovereign Nations”
Traditional Knowledge Story 89

On “the League of Indigenous Sovereign Nations”

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, On “the League of Indigenous Sovereign Nations”
April 18, 2009
 

In 1993, Kenarahdiyoh “Good Leaf” and Dacajeweiah “Splitting the Sky” sat down with Harold Channer, for a one-hour discussion on “the League of Indigenous Sovereign Nations of the Western Hemisphere” (LISN) — a confederation that was founded on May 27, 1991, “in recognition of the need for a concerted course of action to achieve our rights,” by representatives of Indigenous nations from throughout North, Central and South America.

Rooted in Tradition, the LISN sought to “unify the Nations of our people throughout the Western Hemisphere into one great alliance,” to ensure “not only our survival but the advancement of our future generations.”

While the LISN is no longer visible today, the vision and the necessity that gave way to it remains a constant in our lives. Indeed, it has become even more critical that we come together: in defense of the land, to reclaim our sovereignty, to recover our health, and to once again live our own lives according to our own customs and Traditions.

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In the first half of the video you will hear Kenarahdiyoh, a member of the Wolf Clan of the Kahnyen’kehaka (Mohawk) of the Six Nations Confederacy.

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In the second half you will hear Dacajeweiah, also known as John Hill. Also Kahnyen’kehaka, Dacajeweiah was a principal leader of the Attica rebellion, founder of the LISN, and today works as an advocate, speaker, and researcher of 9/11. Dacajeweiah has his own website if you’d like to hear more from him: splittingthesky.blogspot.com.

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