Lampang villagers win lawsuit against power plant
Court Rulings Story 33

Lampang villagers win lawsuit against power plant

Support our journalism. Become a Patron!
John Ahni Schertow
April 7, 2009
 

Lampang villagers win lawsuit against power plantAfter five long years in court, Lampang villagers in Northern Thailand can breathe a much-needed sigh of relief, shallow and full of cancer-causing sulphur though the air may still be.

Last Month the Chiang Mai Administrative Court ordered the Electricity Generating Authority of Thailand (EGAT) to pay 477 villagers approximately 246,000 Baht (US $6,949) each, plus interest, for years of suffering brought on by pollution at the Mae Moh coal-fired power plant in Lampang.

According to Greenpeace, the power plant releases on average 1.6 million tons of sulphur gas into the air each day, over the years causing “irreversible damage to the natural environment” and widespread respiratory problems that have resulted the death of more than 200 people.

Greenpeace also says more than 30,000 people were displaced to make way for the power plant, which first went into operation 17 years ago.

In addition to compensation, the court ordered EGAT to pay for the reallocation of the affected families, and to rehabilitate the local environment.

The villagers were originally asking for 1.8 billion in damages and the permanent closure of the plant, however, Maliwan Nakwirot, leader of “the Network of Patients’ Rights Against Mae Moh Toxic Emissions”, says the villagers are nonetheless satisfied that justice has been served.

Also see: Lessons from a Community’s Struggle with Coal in Thailand

bookmarks Follow IC on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter

We're fighting for our lives

Indigenous Peoples are putting their bodies on the line and it's our responsibility to make sure you know why. That takes time, expertise and resources - and we're up against a constant tide of misinformation and distorted coverage. By supporting IC you're empowering the kind of journalism we need, at the moment we need it most.

independent uncompromising indigenous
Except where otherwise noted, articles on this website are licensed under a Creative Commons License
IC is a publication of the Center for World Indigenous Studies (cwis.org), a 501C(3) based in the United States