Kaiowa

Introduction

Guarani Kaiowa - Mato Grosso do Sul Brazil: archery practiceGuarani-Kaiowá are an indigenous people of the Brazilian state of Mato Grosso do Sul. They inhabit Nhande Ru Marangatu, an area of tropical rainforest that was declared a reservation in October 2004. They are one of the three Guaraní sub-groups (the others being Ñandeva and M’bya).

It is estimated that more than 30,000 Guarani live in Brazil; and 40,000 in Paraguay, where the Guarani language is now considered to be an official language alonside Spanish.

The Guarani sub-groups have different customs and ways of social and political organisation, but all share the same religion which places great importance to the land. The Guaraní believe that all living things, including plants, animals, and water, have protective spirits. The Guarani also have a “secret” and a “sacred” language which is only used by religious leaders.

If you would like to learn more about the Guarani-Kaiowá, visit http://pib.socioambiental.org/en/povo/guarani-kaiowa/553

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