Indigenous People dismissed as non-existent
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Indigenous People dismissed as non-existent

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John Ahni Schertow
July 12, 2007
 

A spokeswoman from Perupetro recently dismissed the existence of uncontacted Indigenous Tribes in Peru — saying “it is like the Loch Ness Monster.” “Everyone seems to have seen or heard about uncontacted peoples, but there is no evidence.”

From Survival International – Ms Quiroz also questioned the recent appearance of uncontacted Kayapó Indians in the Brazilian Amazon, an incident which happened over 1,500 kms away. Ms Quiroz implied that the Indians’ appearance was a fiction to scare off oil companies from bidding for the Peruvian lots.

Only last week a Brazilian government spokesman reported the appearance of yet more uncontacted Indians near the Brazil-Peru frontier. It is thought the Indians are fleeing Peru due to illegal loggers invading their land to cut down some of the world’s last commercially-viable mahogany trees.

Survival International’s Director, Stephen Corry, said today, ‘Perupetro appears to be unaware of the vast amount of evidence that proves beyond doubt the existence of the uncontacted tribes. Even its own government has acknowledged their existence. Of course, if Perupetro gets its way and allows oil exploration in these areas, this may well wipe the Indians out and then they really won’t exist.’ (source)

For further information contact Miriam Ross on (+44) (0)20 7687 8734 or email mr@survival-international.org

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