Help to Stop Romic Buyout.
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Help to Stop Romic Buyout.

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John Ahni Schertow
July 17, 2007
 

This message comes from the Gila River Alliance for a Clean Environment and Greenaction for Health and Environmental Justice:

On June 20, 2007 the Gila River Indian Community Tribal Council voted unanimously 14-0 to reject signing the draft US EPA permit that would have allowed Romic to keep operating their hazardous waste facility on tribal lands. The vote by the tribal council means that by law the US EPA must deny the permit, although EPA is dragging its feet.

The Bad News and Why You Must Take Immediate Action: A giant hazardous waste company called “Clean Harbors” wants to buy the Romic facility and wants the tribal council to give permission to operate a hazardous waste “recycling” operation there.

The Gila River Alliance for a Clean Environment (GRACE), the grassroots tribal member organization, is asking all of us to support their effort to stop Clean Harbors from taking over the facility, and to close the hazardous waste plant once and for all.

What you can do to help tribal members close the Romic facility:

Call “clean harbors” today!!!

Tell them where you are calling from and tell them that clean harbors will face strong ongoing protests and opposition if they buy the Romic plant.

clean harbors toll free number is 800-282-0058

Ask to speak to Phil Retallick and then call back and ask to speak to the CEO of the company.

Call today! Tell Clean Harbors “Get your toxic hands off of Gila River Indian Community”

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