Haudenosaunee move back into Confederacy Council building

Haudenosaunee move back into Confederacy Council building

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John Ahni Schertow
December 31, 2006
 

GRAND RIVER TERRITORY OF THE SIX NATIONS– Six Nations Haudenosaunee are pleased to announce that they will celebrate 2007 by moving back into the old Confederacy Council house in Ohsweken at Six Nations.

The Council House, built in 1864 is 140 years old and predates Confederation. The building served as the council house for the Six Nations Confederacy Council until 1924 when the council was ousted by the Canadian government and an elected band council imposed.

On the first day of the New Year Six Nations people will mark a turning point in their collective history by returning the building to the Haudenosaunee Chiefs in a ceremony at the building.

The move is being heralded as a peaceful movement to begin the healing process and restore Haudenosaunee identity to Six Nations. All Six Nations people and supporters are welcome to attend.

When: Monday, January 1, 2007

Time: 11 a.m.

Where: Old Six Nations Council house, on Fourth Line in the village of Ohsweken

Speeches will be held beginning at 11 a.m. the current lock will be removed and members of Six Nations who were legally barred from the building during a 1959 attempted restoration will be among the first to enter the building followed by Six Nations chiefs and clanmothers and people.

A pot luck will follow.

For further information, contact:

Media Liaison

Lynda Powless

(519)445-0868 or lynda@theturtleislandnews.com

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