Getting Organized

Getting Organized

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May 30, 2012
 

Whether you’re a local version of Occupy claiming the commons as a forum for discussion, or an indigenous nation defending its sovereignty and right to self-determination, getting organized is the hardest part. Everyone has opinions, and many feel compelled to express them as a sort of right of passage; airing them is a necessary element of bonding and commitment. But at some point — if we want to be successful — we need to get organized by taking on tasks that lead to more intelligent use of the resources at our disposal–energy and morale being two important ones.

Both Occupy assemblies and indigenous councils benefit from getting organized in their own ways, but one feature they have in common is the need for specific functions to be performed–those functions being Research, Education, Organizing and Action. When someone assumes the role of director of one of these functions on behalf of a council or assembly, the political entity they serve then knows who to bring relevant information and concerns to. As these leaders recruit others to assist them in these vital tasks, areas of special focus previously neglected can receive greater attention, thereby increasing the effective capacity of the group.

Although these functions often overlap, the aptitude and skill sets they attract usually vary enough that the synergy from functional interaction brings a diversity of perspectives that enhances the quality of each. At its best, it becomes a holistic experience.

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