Fascism in the United States

Fascism in the United States

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March 18, 2014
 

Fascism rationalizes theft in varying ways. The victims of fascism range from class to religious to racial to ethnic minorities. Under neoliberal fascism, no one is immune to oligarchical theft, although some whites seek to side with oligarchs by rationalizing its imposition on religious, racial or ethnic minorities. Witness the Tea Party.

Fascism has a long history in the United States. Theft of other peoples’ property, labor and lives is what made the American oligarchy possible. More so in the South, but in reality, everywhere there was a minority community, poor whites or an Indian tribe.

Fascism today plays out in many ways, but the anti-Indian movement is one of the ugliest. As American Indian tribes assert legal jurisdiction over their reservations and resources, their children enrolled in public schools bear the brunt of fascism based on race. Wherever resource extraction conflicts with tribal treaties, Indian kids will be targets.

Fascism as an institution depends in large part on political control. Depriving Indians and Blacks of equal access to voting is one example. Corruption of elections using stolen wealth is another.

Fascism as a social movement, however, depends mostly on ignorance. Ignorance combined with bigotry is what makes institutionalizing fascism possible.

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