Decolonizing Indigenous Fatherhood: Understanding Our Masculinity beyond Imposed Meaning

Decolonizing Indigenous Fatherhood: Understanding Our Masculinity beyond Imposed Meaning

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January 8, 2018
 

Decolonizing Indigenous Fatherhood: Understanding Our Masculinity beyond Imposed Meaning

by Devi Mucina
To start this engagement, I would like to give you a specific contextualize notion of Indigenous fatherhood as interpreted from the relational paradigm of Ubuntuism. This Indigenous African paradigm of Ubuntuism was first given to me through our Indigenous African oral structure of communication. Given that I left Zimbabwe at the age of 21 and have lived in Canada for 25 years, I have had to nurture my Ubuntu scholarship through centering my childhood memories of Ubuntu teachings, while also researching texts as a way of addressing the gaps in my memories or as a way of gaining new knowledge. In doing this, I have engaged through dialogue with other Indigenous scholars who center their personal, political and spiritual realities of relational connectivity, which embodies Ubuntuism.

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