A Reassuring Narrative

A Reassuring Narrative

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October 24, 2012
 

It is not unusual to encounter Americans who still subscribe to the view that there is a contest between good and evil within the U.S. Government, with Central Intelligence pitted against the Department of State over human rights, or the Justice Department wrestling with the Department of Homeland Security over civil rights.  Good guys and bad guys duking it out over freedom at home and abroad, often with the benign fatherly intervention of the president. A reassuring narrative for an infantile audience.

But as any astute and honest observer will note, the Government of the United States does not work that way. There are differences, to be sure, but within the executive branch, renegades are rare and short-lived. What is the norm is the cooperation between departments in furthering American hegemony, with each department playing its assigned role, including that of public relations.

As noted at the website Color Revolutions and Geopolitics, color revolutions are, without a doubt, one of the main features of global political developments today, and that as psychosocial operations of deception — often funded by the U.S. Government — these regime change operations are designed to manipulate emotions and circumvent critical thinking. As a corollary to the use of fear as a primary instrument to initiate and justify dangerous shifts in public policy, the promotion of false hope by government agencies working in tandem with co-opted NGOs, says CRG, leads naive Americans to believe in the authenticity of popular democracy and revolutionary fervor represented by the color-coded uprisings.

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