A movement of Tradition emerges in Venezuela

A movement of Tradition emerges in Venezuela

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John Ahni Schertow
July 23, 2007
 

There was an important gathering in Caracas last week—Indigenous People from all over Venezuela came together for the First Meeting of Indigenous and Socialist Indigenous Warriors.

The focus of the gathering was to build a movement of people who hold a “Revolutionary Conscience and Spirit of Real Solidarity.”

Among many attendants, was Nicia Maldonado, the Minister of “People’s Power for Indigenous Peoples” who explained in an interview that indigenous communities have begun creating groups called “seed” indigenous warriors– young people between the ages of 7 and 15 years old. These groups must do voluntary work in their communities, without expecting any kind of payment “as the communities have always done.”

Other groups are being created for those aged 16 to 25. Youth here are particularly responsible for creating “indo american socialism” based on the example of the Earth.

Finally, there is the group of those over 25 — who’s responsibility it is to pass down the knowledge to the younger ones — and to simply “make progress.”

From www.abn.info.ve – the national supervisor of indigenous communal councils Facundo Guanipa stressed that the indo American socialism is not an innovation for native peoples “because since 3,000 years ago, the indigenous peoples of America carry out this solidarity system in their communities.”

He also said that through the indo American socialism, the indigenous peoples strengthen their identity, defense and collective work to develop the hunting, the agriculture, the fishing, the traditional medicine and the preservation of the natural resources, among other traditional activities of the ancient peoples.

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